I only just now realized that I mistyped my own url on the back cover of my entry to the comics workbook competition.

Mosquito Creek — Panic Volkushka
for the Comics Workbook Composition Competition Mosquito Creek — Panic Volkushka
for the Comics Workbook Composition Competition Mosquito Creek — Panic Volkushka
for the Comics Workbook Composition Competition Mosquito Creek — Panic Volkushka
for the Comics Workbook Composition Competition Mosquito Creek — Panic Volkushka
for the Comics Workbook Composition Competition Mosquito Creek — Panic Volkushka
for the Comics Workbook Composition Competition Mosquito Creek — Panic Volkushka
for the Comics Workbook Composition Competition Mosquito Creek — Panic Volkushka
for the Comics Workbook Composition Competition Mosquito Creek — Panic Volkushka
for the Comics Workbook Composition Competition

Mosquito Creek — Panic Volkushka

for the Comics Workbook Composition Competition

proof that I’m still alive and making art

working on a piece for molly-ren

details from “Pretty Bunny/Ugly Hare” details from “Pretty Bunny/Ugly Hare” details from “Pretty Bunny/Ugly Hare”

"Pretty Bunny/Ugly Hare"

acrylic and stickers on canvas board, 14 x 18

PRINTS AVAILABLE

Something of a continuation on the theme of “fuck your fascist cuteness standards.”

Inspired by the Playboy Bunny as a restrictive concept of American female beauty, the different connotations of the words “bunny” and “hare,” and overhearing a pregnant woman discuss her fears that her unborn child would be born with a “hare lip,” because that had “just ruined” Joaquin Phoenix’s face.

Slightly dissatisfied with this painting, actually. I have a tendency to push shadows darker than I would like, and that happened in this piece. I want to develop an ability to work with paler palettes.

However, this is the first time that I’ve really tried mixing a more deliberately stylized look with traditional painting, and I am very pleased with how that turned out.

Shhh… It’s my dad’s Father’s Day gift! A portrait of Samuel Beckett.

I’ve been listening to the audiobook of “The Killer of Little Shepherds: A True Crime Story and the Birth of Forensic Science” by Douglas Starr.

It’s the case of a French serial killer in the late 1800s, Joseph Vascher, and the development of early forensic science by Alexandre Lacassagne.

Lacassagne worked in Lyon, France, where the morgue was housed on a barge in the Rhône. The reasoning was that this would keep the stench away from the city and it was close to the two largest sources of corpses — the hospital and the river itself. However, there were problems.

Joseph was a problem child…

details from “Amateur Psychoanalysis.” details from “Amateur Psychoanalysis.” details from “Amateur Psychoanalysis.”
details from “Sharpen and Blur.” details from “Sharpen and Blur.”

"Sharpen and Blur"

acrylic on canvas board, 16 x 11

PRINTS AVAILABLE

This is one of those pieces that… doesn’t really have a deeper meaning behind it. The body is my favorite subject for art, so the way that scar tissue can alter it fascinates me. I realized I’d never done a painting of someone with a facial scar and decided to do one. As the painting progressed, I started thinking of how my greatgrandmother described the experience of having cataracts — she said it was like seeing through layers of veils. So I smeared the hell out of the background and added layers of matte medium over the sections of the image that I wanted to push backwards.

And so that’s how this came about.